Women in The Saint John’s bible

I grew up knowing that women had a place in the world that was less:  less smart, less brave, less strong, less relevant.  The patriarchal society reinforced this view for our society, politics, and education.  It was only when I went to a Catholic High School, run by a feisty order of Dominican nuns, that I realised that I was more and had endless capacity to be more than more.  The nuns pushed us outside of the societal, political and education bounds and asked us to look inside ourselves and answer a question:  What else?  

 

This notion of finding the next “What else?” has been one of my driving forces in my life.  What else can I do?  What else can I learn?  What else can I contribute to?  What else can I be doing to make this world a better place?  And when in 1998 I first learned about The Saint John’s bible, I found my next “What else?”

 

The question then became: what to do.  Here was an art project of monumental worth and importance to 21st century people, wrapped up as a bible and a statement on our world.  Over the years I continued my studies and submersion into the illuminations and philosophy of The Saint John’s bible, letting it infuse my DNA and artistry.

 

Which brings me to today – one month after we opened an exhibition of original pages of the bible at The Museum at the Hjemkomst (HCSCC).  More years of planning than I can really remember but working with a team of volunteers who answered the call to be more and finding what else they could do.  It has been a whirlwind experience.  The winds of change and uncertainty have given me sleepless nights and exhilarating encounters.  I have seen the profound effects of art on people and how story telling and painted pictures alter world views and closely held principles.  

 

And I have seen women see themselves in the illuminations:  strong, brace, caring, smart, respected, powerful.  So pull up a chair, grab a cup of tea and your handcraft, and listen for 15 minutes to more of my thinking on women in The Saint John’s Bible and why this matters to everyone.  The interview starts at the 27:13 mark.  Thank you to Ashley Thornberg at Prairie Public radio for this interview on October 30th.  The direct url is:  http://www.prairiepublic.org/radio/mainstreet?post=71573 so then you do not have to hunt for the interview in the archives.

Main Street

Here is the link to the Facebook posting

Docent info

Hi there

Here is the new schedule link.

Docent Signups 101417 Sorted by name Docent Signups 101417

Docent Signups 101417

 

I will keep updating this page so book mark this link for the most up to date info at any time – this will probably work better than the email system.  But I will still send emails to tell you to come and check here. 

 
 

Here is the docent document:

Docent Checklist – 10/1/17 Rev 2

Start of any shift

  1. Check in, log you start time on the log. Get your nametag and vest. Put any valuables in the blue opaque box on the shelf.  
  2. There is a micro fiber cloth to clean the cases and the Plexiglass. NO – not a drop or hint – of water or cleaner should be used.  We are dry dusting everything only.
  3. Be aware of the magnifiers, brochures, and cards. Keep track of them.
  4. The iPad lives at the front desk. A docent, guest and iPad form a 3 unit team.  Do not let the iPad out of your sight.
  5. The tools: check them out morning and night. Make sure they are all there.  There are 13 units.  These are all from Anne’s personal collection and the St John’s feather – which can also be bought in the gift shop and is a collector’s item as no more are being made – if the most precious.  The rest of the tools range in value from nothing to $25. 
  6. Sign in – we need to check the volunteer hours
  7. Turn TV on – there are 3 movies that play in a loop
  8. Books – these are for your reference. Remind people that they can buy the books and SJB volumes in the gift shop.
  9. Check the clipboards and exemplars – there should be blank paper, a calligraphy pen and the lettering sample on the clipboard. We have two sets but one will be enough on the table in the gallery most days.
  10. Every guest in the gallery will or should have an SJB sticker. If they have an Hjemkomst sticker, they have not paid for the Saint John’s Bible exhibit.  If they do not have the correct SJB sticker, ask them nicely and politely to return to the front desk to correct the problem.  The staff are ready for this.  Keep a count of how many of sneaking down and trying to get into the exhibit assuming that they have access? Let Maureen know how many people you have to ask to go back upstairs so that she can fix any process issues if needed. The process upstairs is new to those volunteers and given the number of steps that are now introduced, it will take a while for the volunteers to remember all the extra steps.  Run upstairs and ask one of the staff to help out.  On the weekends, be nice, friendly and firm and if they resist, walk away.   A rule of St Benedict is to welcome all guests as if they were a Christ.  If someone is so determined not to pay the $5 upcharge, they probably need a little more love in their lives and maybe this exhibition is it.
  11. When you take a break, visit the break room behind the office for water and snack’ums. The water is in the far right fridge and the Trail Mix is in a box on top of the box.  When the levels are low, let Anne know (701-205-INKS) so she can buy more.  There are always treats on the table in the break room and you can sample.
  12. Welcome guests and listen to them. Have fun.
  13. Update the date in the guest book and remind people to sign in. Remind people to write in the journal.
  14. Use an inside voice. Do not hog guests and talk for ages.  Engage and then set them free to tour the gallery. 

At the end of your shift:

  1. If there are no guests, please run the vacuum around. 
  2. Check the cases and clean as needed.
  3. Check on the tools, iPad, magnifiers, brochures, etc. Let the office know of shortages.
  4. Make sure the books are on the docent desk.
  5. Check magnifiers
  6. Pack up the journal into the 12×12 box.
  7. Check out at the Dove Center. Logout on the book, make comments and notes.  Let Anne know of anything that worried you.  If it is a gallery deficiency, let Markus and/or Matt know.  Changes might not be made.
  8. Return your name tag and vest. Claim your valuables.
  9. Log out from your shift and leave comments.
  10. Tell the staff upstairs at the desk or the gift shop or office that you leaving and no one is in the gallery so they can lock up.

Notes: 


 

Things that will happen:

I am making 3 books – 2 of which you saw with Tim.  The book that unfolds from a personal book to a community book and another book that shows the signatures/gatherings and page numbers.

Wendy has Post It’s and gel pens for people to write things that illuminated them as they toured the gallery.  These will be posted on a board and gathered up and then submitted to St John’s for their archives.  We might bring these boards out on weekends as one more activity for people to engage in.

 

Reminder:  The key is communication.  We are all here to help each other.  I love getting emails of changes to the schedule.  If you cannot make a shift, maybe call a friend to cover you.  Let us know.  Update the schedule.  I am here to help make you successful. 

 

YOU ARE AMAZING! GO AND ILLUMINATE OTHERS – SHARE THE LIGHT AND LOVE!

AND THANK YOU. 

 

Anne Kaese

Calligraphy@AnneKaese.com

701-205-INKS (4657)

 

 

                                                                                        

Decorated Letters make for a fun evening

It is always a pleasure to share The Saint John’s Bible and art with others.  Sometimes I get a little too carried away by it but I am not fussed – I think we can only have more art and more talking points in our lives.  Caring and sharing is where it is at!

So the possibility of raising money and doing art led me to create an accessible workshop for all that I call Decorated Letters.  It is a fun, non-intimidating way of connect with people around the table and doing art.  Here is what The Arts Partnership had to say about the event:

Anne Kaese Calligraphy Hosting Letter Decorating Class To Benefit Upcoming St. John’s Bible Exhibit

By Kendra Klein | June 7th, 2017 | 

Looking at instructor Anne Kaese’s beautifully hand-crafted calligraphy, the ancient practice can seem complex and intimidating. However, the evening of art, food, and wine Kaese is offering from 6 – 8 p.m. this Thursday at Gethsemane Cathedral will be completely the opposite.

The class is all about learning basic letters and techniques of calligraphy, then allowing creativity to take over. The food and wine is a bonus.

Anne Kaese was born in South Africa, where she was introduced to calligraphy at the age of twelve. In South Africa, calligraphy is viewed as a high art form, and Kaese brings this respect, history and tradition of calligraphy to each of her classes. She describes herself overall as a heritage artist. “If it was popular three to four hundred years ago, I’m probably into that,” she says.

Kaese emphasizes there is no wrong way to make art. She wants her students to give themselves permission to play, because her classes are about slowing down and appreciating the creative process.

Kaese is donating her time to host this event, and proceeds will go to the St. John’s Bible exhibit. The Bible will be coming to the Historical and Cultural Society in Moorhead this October, but Kaese has been following the project since 1998. It ties in nicely with everything the artist is already passionate about. She pointed out how many disciplines this project brings together: history, archaeology, theology, science, art, and imagination, to name a few.

In her classes, Kaese brings people together through art. The St. John’s Bible is a work of art that acknowledges social and technological advances of the modern world, and provides a focal point for discussion. Visitors will bring their own interpretations and background to understand the art, and Kaese believes that is the whole point. She says the St. John’s Bible “triggers something that sparks curiosity.”

Decorated letters this Thursday, and all of Kaese’s classes in conjunction with The St. John’s Bible exhibit, focus on making art accessible to people and allowing creativity to happen without the pressure of perfection. Kaese says that previous students have described her classes not as an education, but as a discovery.

If you aren’t able to make it to this Thursday’s installment of art, food, and wine, Anne Kaese will offer another class on October 21st.

Photo courtesy of Anne Kaese.

All photos are courtesy of Anne Kaese Calligraphy.